D2W degradable refuse sacks 10 pack

D2W degradable Refuse Sacks 70l (10 pack)

£1.99

  • Biodegradable d2w technology speeds up the natural process of oxidation
  • Claims that the plastic stops being a plastic
  • Becomes a material with can be eaten by bacteria and fungi on land or at sea
  • If it makes it to landfill will also biodegrade due to exposure to oxygen
  • Can also be recycled with other plastics
  • Claims that it does not leave behind toxic residues or microplastics

In stock

About the product

D2w is an additive made by a British Company called Symphony Environmental. Symphony Environmental specialises in the development of additives which makes ordinary plastic, biodegradable. D2w has been mixed into the plastic of these bin liners in the process of production, now making them biodegradable. They potentially offer an eco-friendly alternative to regular plastic bin bags which tend to take hundreds of years to degrade.

Feels like normal plastic

These bin liners act just like normal plastic in terms of its strength, look and flexibility.

Recyclable and oxo-biodegradable plastic

These 50l bin liners are fully recyclable and made from oxo-biogradable plastic which will degrade within 12 to 18 months in optimal conditions. Being oxo-biodegradable means these bin liners will biodegrade anywhere there is oxygen.

How it works

  • Biodegradable d2w technology speeds up the natural process of oxidation
  • The plastic stops being a plastic
  • Becomes a material with can be eaten by bacteria and fungi on land or at sea
  • If it makes it to landfill will also biodegrade due to exposure to oxygen
  • Can also be recycled with other plastics
  • Claims not to leave behind any toxic residues or microplastics

Storage warning

Do not store these bags in direct sunlight or a warm climate (like a car or warm garage) as this accelerates the rate of degradation.

Not intended for composting.

The debate

There has been debate surrounding the oxo-biodegradable technology.

The BBC questioned its claims. Check out their report here.

In December 2017 the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) investigated the claims and 10 months into the investigation ECHA advised that they were not yet convinced that microplastics were formed. Unfortunately the European Commission terminated ECHA’s enquiry before any conclusive results were found.

In 2018 Symphony Environmental commissioned a report from former British Lawyer, Peter Susman QC, a deputy judge of the high court in England, who had over 25 years experience of adjudicating cases in the technology and construction branch of the high court, involving the evaluation of expert evidence. He declared the scientific case in favour of oxo-biodegradable plastic to be “clear and compelling”. (Sources: Wikipedia,Symphony Enivronmental).

Our position on the debate

Unfortunately we do not have all the information we would like to have in this case, however we believe that when choosing between continuing using bin liners that we know for sure will pollute our seas and landfill for hundreds of years, or try a technology which appears to work and has not been proven to be ineffective, we feel it is worth the benefit of doubt and we will continue to sell this product. That being said we will continue to follow this debate and invite you to share with us your opinions to info@thesimplestore.co.uk.

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